FORTHCOMING EVENTS

Qui Timet Deum

5th March Lassus - Cantiones Sacrae Sex Vocum and Gesualdo – Tenebrae Responsoria for Holy Week

Qui Timet Deum follows a programme of music for six voices by the renaissance composers Orlande de Lassus (1532-1594) and Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613).

The Cantiones Sacrae Sex Vocum by Lassus is the composer’s final book of motets, published in the year of his death. The collection features some of his most accomplished and beautiful compositions, setting music to a range of texts and themes.

Gesualdo’s collection of responsories for Holy Week deals with texts that follow the evocative story of Jesus’s crucifixion. His music captures the intense emotional conflicts associated with Christ’s death through the use of jarring dissonances and warped tonal progressions – the hallmarks of his later style.

Do listen to the short preview video from a recent rehearsal.

Qui Timet Deum, latest concert from Fount and Origin, a new early music vocal ensemble in Oxford

29th May
Anglia Rubet: The Quest for English Polyphony through the 15th Century (more details coming soon!)

Previous EVENTS

5th March 2019 - Quit Timet Deum: Lassus - Cantiones Sacrae Sex Vocum and Gesualdo – Tenebrae Responsoria for Holy Week

Qui Timet Deum follows a programme of music for six voices by the renaissance composers Orlande de Lassus (1532-1594) and Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613).

The Cantiones Sacrae Sex Vocum by Lassus is the composer’s final book of motets, published in the year of his death. The collection features some of his most accomplished and beautiful compositions, setting music to a range of texts and themes.

Gesualdo’s collection of responsories for Holy Week deals with texts that follow the evocative story of Jesus’s crucifixion. His music captures the intense emotional conflicts associated with Christ’s death through the use of jarring dissonances and warped tonal progressions – the hallmarks of his later style.

9th February 2019 - Ockeghem’s Missa Caput: The music of Jean de Ockeghem and Leonel Power

Jean de Ockeghem (d.1497) is considered the most famous and influential composer of the second-generation Franco-Flemish school. Almost certainly written in the 1440s, early in Ockeghem’s career, the Missa Caput contains some of his most beautiful and unusual counterpoint. It is a wonderful example of the sort of experimentation which ushered in the era of musical renaissance in the fifteenth century.

Leonel Power (d.1445) represents an earlier generation – born in England in the late fourteenth-century, Power and his probably younger compatriot John Dunstaple were both highly influential in culivating a new musical aesthetic. Power’s style combines characteristically-English rich sonorities with French rhythmic intricacy and invention. The composer and theorist Johannes Tinctoris (c.1435-1511) comments in his Proportionale Musices (1472-3) on the ‘new art’, and credits the English (and particularly Dunstaple) as its fons et origo (fount and origin). The programme features some of Power’s polyphonic motets and antiphons.

3rd November 2018 - Dufay’s Missa Ave Regina Caelorum

Dufay’s last surviving mass, Missa Ave Regina Caelorum, represents the breathtaking culmination of his musical career, boasting both established late-medieval gothic technique and the beauty and clarity of the new Renaissance art. The Mass movements will be interspersed by some of Dufay’s motets, contrasting the unique colours beholden to the various stages of his life.